Graduate College

Scholarship and Research

For most graduate students, research is a major component of their degree program. This section offers resources on some of the “nuts and bolts” of effective scholarly research, including citation styles, source management and how to prepare a conference presentation. If you’re planning to use human subjects in your research, you’ll also find critical information on obtaining Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval for your project. Finally, our podcast series on the ethics of authorship answers your questions about who should be included as an author on papers—and in what order.

Citation and Research Management

Refworks
Discover the web-based world of RefWorks Bibliographic Management Software to help organize your research notes and source material.

Google Scholar at ASU Libraries
Google Scholar is an Internet research tool for those interested in searching for scholarly literature. Google Scholar sifts through the deluge of Internet content by limiting its searches to only reputable academic journal articles.

Habits of Success

Passion and discipline: the building blocks of success
Dr. Carlos Castillo-Chavez, Regents' Professor, and Joaqin Bustoz Jr., Professor of Mathematical Biology in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, speaks to the importance of passion and discipline in order to be a successful, productive, and engaged researcher. Podcast: iTunes [19:00]

Routines, habits and tactics
Dr. Ranu Jung, a Professor in Bioengineering, discusses the routines, habits and tactics to increase your research productivity to help you accomplish your dreams. Podcast: iTunes [16:25]

Conference Presentations

Crafting and delivering your presentation
Dr. Paul Hirt, a Professor in History, discusses crafting and delivering your presentation to engage the academic audience and maximize the impact of your opportunity to interact with scholars in your field. Podcast: iTunes [14:08]

Keep it simple
Dr. Marcia Levitus, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, shares some insights and advice on creating and delivering conference presentations, specifically the importance of keeping it simple and speaking to your audience. Podcast: iTunes [33:29]

The nuts and bolts of an academic conference presentation
Dr. Linda Vaughan, the Associate Dean of the School of Applied Arts and Sciences, discusses the nuts and bolts of an academic conference presentation, from writing the abstract to networking at the conference. Podcast: iTunes [21:15]

Responsible Conduct of Research

Historical background and key regulations of the IRB 
Dr. Mark Roosa, Professor in the School of Social and Family Dynamics and Chair of the Social Behavioral Institutional Review Board (IRB), discusses historical events in the U.S. and other countries that led to the development of federal regulations and ethical codes governing research involving human subjects. He also reviews the key aspects of these regulations as they apply to research at ASU. Podcast: iTunes

Facilitating the IRB approval process
Dr. Roosa provides an overview of the IRB approval process, including categories of research, protection of information, and how you can facilitate approval for your study. He also answers questions regarding the ownership of data shared between a faculty mentor and student and data collected at another institution. Podcast: iTunes

Avoiding common pitfalls in IRB applications
In this segment, Dr. Roosa offers advice on how graduate students and faculty can avoid common mistakes in submitting their IRB applications. He also discusses types of research that always require review by the Full Board, ensuring that you have obtained informed consent, and the responsibilities of the Principal Investigator (PI). Podcast: iTunes

Approval to use human subjects
All research activities involving the use of human subjects must be reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) before data collection can begin. Susan Metosky, Senior Compliance Coordinator at the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development, explains the process for Dr. Elizabeth Segal’s Graduate Social Work Seminar. The graduate students ask critical questions about the process especially when working with high-risk participants, from teenagers to prostitutes. Visit our iTunesU page to download the podcasts to your computer or player.

An overview of the IRB approval process: the exempt, expedited and full board process
Susan Metosky
of the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development provides an overview of the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and describes some of the differences between the different review processes: exempt, expedited, and full board. Podcast: iTunes [15:05]

The full board review process
Susan Metosky
of the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development describes the full board review process and the makeup of each board. Podcast: iTunes [4:47]

When to submit your IRB application
Susan Metosky
of the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development answers questions about when to submit your IRB application and common misconceptions about the full board meeting deadline. Podcast: iTunes [0:27]

What to do and what not to do in your IRB application
Susan Metosky
of the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development discusses what to do and what not to do when designing your study and preparing your IRB application. Podcast: iTunes [1:09]

Making changes to an IRB-approved study
Susan Metosky
of the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development answers questions about procedures to change a study that has already been approved by the IRB. Podcast: iTunes [0:57]

Required training for all researchers who submit IRB applications
Susan Metosky
of the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development describes the training that is required by the IRB for all researchers submitting applications. Podcast: iTunes [0:44]

Reasons a faculty member is always the principal investigator (pi)
Susan Metosky
of the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development explains the rationale for having a faculty member as the principal investigator (PI), even if it is a graduate student’s research. Podcast: iTunes [3:30]

Being proactive and sensitive to vulnerable research populations
Susan Metosky
of the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development discusses ways that researchers can be proactive and sensitive in working with vulnerable populations. Podcast: iTunes [14:13]

Collaborating with outside agencies who have a separate IRB process
Susan Metosky
of the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development describes procedures when working with an outside agency that has an internal IRB process. Podcast: iTunes [0:44]

Collaborating with researchers who have IRB approval at other universities
Susan Metosky
of the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development answers questions about working with researchers at another university with existing IRB approval for their project. Podcast: iTunes [2:04]

IRB approval of data collected at another agency (secondary data)
Susan Metosky
of the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development discusses protocol for using data previously collected as part of a study at an outside agency or in the classroom. Podcast: iTunes [6:24]

Paying research participants
Susan Metosky
of the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development answers questions about procedures for paying research participants. Podcast: iTunes [5:30]

Paying mail survey respondents
Susan Metosky
of the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development discusses issues regarding compensating mail survey respondents. Podcast: iTunes [3:01]

Conducting research over the Internet
Susan Metosky
of the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development answers questions about conducting research over the internet and utilizing social media applications. Podcast: iTunes [6:38]

Safeguarding vulnerable populations in online studies
Susan Metosky
of the ASU Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development describes requirements for safeguarding vulnerable populations involved in online studies. Podcast: iTunes [0:36]

Project for scholarly integrity (psi)
The Council of Graduate Schools has launched an interactive website dedicated to topics in the responsible conduct of research (RCR) and research ethics in graduate education, with an emphasis on comprehensive approaches to RCR education and strategies for institutionalizing RCR and research ethics programs.

On being a scientist
The National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering and Institute of Medicine provide an online book and podcasts on the responsible conduct of research. On Being a Scientist: A Guide to Responsible Conduct in Research: Third Edition (2009) provides graduate students, early careers scientists and faculty insight on how to conduct responsible research and how to respond in complex ethical situations.

Office of Research Integrity and Assurance
The Office of Research Integrity and Assurance (ORIA) was established as a resource for investigators and the university as a whole to achieve and maintain ethical principles and compliance with federal, state and university regulations governing research. ORIA offers workshops each semester for graduate students and postdoctoral researchers on various research topics.

Ethics of Authorship

Perspectives on the ethics of authorship
Dr. Joan Brett, Associate Vice Provost of Graduate Education, moderates a panel discussion with faculty members Jon Harrison from the School of Life Sciences, Sandra Stauffer from the School of Music, Terry Alford from the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, and Ayanna Thompson from the Department of English, on authorship issues that many graduate students face.  Some of the topics discussed include whether advisors are included as authors on papers, how order of authorship is determined, and when someone should be included as an author. The panel also answers questions from graduate students about issues of authorship, collaboration, plagiarism and intellectual property. Listen to the five-part podcast series below.

  1. Authorship and advisors: Is your advisor always listed as an author on your paper? What are the exceptions? When should you expect to be included as an author on your advisor’s research paper? Does data collection automatically warrant authorship? When should you bring up issues of authorship with your advisor? Free royalty-free music from danosongs.com. Podcast: iTunes [11:44]
  2. Order of authorship: Who should be listed in the first author position? What about the last position? What does it mean to be listed first, last, or somewhere in between? Order of authorship means different things across disciplines. Learn more about what the positions mean and how the order is determined in various fields. Free royalty-free music from danosongs.com. Podcast: iTunes [9:56]
  3. Ethical dilemmas you might face: Faculty members describe ethical dilemmas they have faced when collaborating with graduate students. What are the pros and cons of collaboration in the humanities? When should others be included on patent applications? Can work from a forthcoming dissertation be published as a coauthored piece?  Find out the answers and learn how you can be proactive to avoid problems down the road.  Free royalty-free music from danosongs.com. Podcast: iTunes [7:10]
  4. Student questions about authorship issues: part 1: Questions discussed include: When should you simply cite previous work versus granting authorship? Is there a limit on the number of co-authors, and can too many authors weaken a paper? What constitutes a significant intellectual contribution to a project? If data is generated at ASU, does it belong to the student or the advisor? Free royalty-free music from danosongs.com. Podcast: iTunes [12:57]
  5. Student questions about authorship issues: part 2: More graduate student questions including: What should I do if another student or faculty member has plagiarized my work? How is authorship determined in collaborations between different labs or universities? How should I handle conflicts over authorship with my advisor? Who owns intellectual property at the university? Free royalty-free music from danosongs.com. Podcast: iTunes [17:32]